Evictions and housing management: toward more effective strategies

Summary

Key groups at risk of eviction are: people living alone, young people, sole parents, older men, people with substance abuse problems, and women escaping domestic violence. Evictions have detrimental effects on those evicted, and result in increased costs for governments. The circumstances warranting eviction could be prevented by counselling and education programs for key at risk groups.

Project Number: 40192
Research Theme(s): Homelessness and housing
Project Leader: Beer, Andrew
Funding Year: 2003
Research Centre: Southern

Published research reports

Download now Research and Policy Bulletin: Issue 073: Evictions and Housing Management
112 KB PDF Document

Download now Positioning Paper: No. 076: Evictions and housing management: toward more effective strategies
2.4 MB PDF Document

Download now Final Report: No. 094: Evictions and housing management
438 KB PDF Document

Description

The research was based on interviews with 143 people evicted from public and private rental tenancies in South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria, which identified those groups at risk of eviction, the causes and outcomes of eviction, and the nature of the eviction process.

The key findings of the research are:

  • Post eviction, the percentage of people receiving income support rises from 70 to 90 per cent and the percentage living in public housing rises from 10 to 15 per cent.
  • The main reason for eviction, common to private and public tenancies, is rent arrears (45 per cent, n=103 of evictions).
  • Very few evictions (7 per cent, n=10) are the result of bailiff or police action and only four per cent (n=6) result from formal magistrate court or residential tenancy tribunal orders. Thirty-two per cent (n=47) of tenants left their tenancy prior to any formal action by their landlords due to dispute and expected eviction. Forty-four per cent (n=64) of tenants left their tenancy on receipt of a formal request to vacate.
  • The circumstances warranting eviction could be prevented by counselling and education programs for key ‘at risk’ groups.