Glossary

Purpose
The purpose of this glossary is to define terms commonly used in our research. It is a reference to familiarise you with housing-specific terms in our publications and on our website.

Scope
This glossary is limited to terms and acronyms most used by Australian academics and governments.

Format
All entries are listed in alphabetical order, including acronyms (which are cross-referenced with their corresponding definition.) Click on the appropriate letter to see listing.

Feedback
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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

S

shared equity

A form of home purchase shared between the occupying household and a ‘silent partner’—usually a government or not for profit agency. Typically the household will hold 80 per cent of the equity and the silent partner the other 20 per cent. This style of loan often allows the householder to increase or decrease their equity holding over time, and therefore their mortgage costs, as their income circumstances change.

social exclusion

Social exclusion is fundamentally about a lack of connectedness and participation. It is not the equivalent of poverty (i.e. inadequate economic resources) or deprivation (i.e. an enforced lack of social perceived necessities). May also be referred to as marginalisation.

social housing

Rental housing that is provided and/or managed by government or non-government organisations, including public and community housing.

social impact bonds

A form of investment product that finances provision of key basic services. Social impact bonds are targeted at investors seeking appropriate risk-adjusted returns while also achieving valuable social outcomes.

social inclusion

In the Australian policy context, social inclusion is conceptualised as the opportunity to participate in society through employment and access to services, connect with family, friends and the local community, deal with personal crises and be heard.

social mix

Defined as a ‘combination of diverse shares of social groups in a neighbourhood’. A social group has one or more factors in common, such as having similar economic resources (i.e. having low- or high-income), the same ethnic background or nativity (i.e. born in the same country), the same household structure (e.g. families with children or households of young singles) or the same tenure (i.e. being tenants or home owners/buyers).

stock transfer

In the Australian context, this generally refers to two different types of transactions used by governments to transfer management of housing assets:

  • ‘management outsourcing’ transfers where public housing management is contractually delegated to a community housing provider for continued use as social housing (regardless of whether a new lease has been signed by the tenant)
  • ‘asset transfers’ (or ‘title transfers’) where the ownership of public housing assets (tenanted or vacant) is transferred to a Community Housing provider for use as social housing.

strata title

Strata title allows individual ownership of part of a property, combined with shared ownership in the remainder (e.g. foyers, driveways, gardens) through a legal entity called the owners corporation—or body corporate, strata company or community association, depending on your state or territory of residence and the type of scheme.

supply side assistance

Forms of housing assistance given to providers, not consumers, of housing to help increase the quantity or quality of housing (e.g. National Rental Affordability Scheme).

Also see demand side assistance