Precarious housing and wellbeing: a multi-dimensional investigation

The relationship between precarious housing and wellbeing

webinar

6 April 2022; 2.00pm-3.30pm AEST

Wellbeing is a critical and internationally recognised yardstick of societal progress and policy impact, putting individuals at the centre of evaluation. Precarious housing includes household-based conditions such as forced moves and living in unaffordable housing or overcrowded housing, and area-based precarious housing conditions, such as living in an area of relative socio-economic disadvantage or in a higher crime area.

This free webinar presented findings from the AHURI research project — Precarious housing and wellbeing: a multi-dimensional investigation — led by Professor Rachel Ong ViforJ, Curtin University. This research examines how the bi-directional relationship between housing precariousness and wellbeing varies across population subgroups and over time; sheds light on the dimensions of housing precariousness that affect wellbeing, and vice versa; and considers how policy interventions to effectively minimise negative impacts of precarious housing on wellbeing.

The webinar included a research presentation by Professor Ong ViforJ, an industry response by Emma Greenhalgh, CEO, National Shelter, and an audience Q&A facilitated by Dr Michael Fotheringham, Managing Director, AHURI.

The webinar recording will be made available as soon as possible.

In this 90-minute webinar you will learn:
  • How has the relationship between housing precariousness and wellbeing changed over time?
  • Does housing assistance mitigate the influence of housing precariousness on wellbeing?
  • How can policy interventions be timed to effectively minimise any negative impacts of precarious housing on wellbeing?
  • Which dimensions of housing precariousness affect wellbeing? Which dimensions of wellbeing affect housing precariousness?

SPEAKER

Professor Rachel Ong ViforJ, Australian Research Council Future Fellow and Professor of Economics, Curtin University

 

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Rachel Ong Viforj

Rachel Ong ViforJ is currently an Australian Research Council Future Fellow and Professor of Economics at Curtin University. Her research interests include the role of housing in Australia’s ageing population, intergenerational housing concerns, housing pathways and the links between housing and non-shelter outcomes. She is currently undertaking research in three major areas – intergenerational housing wealth inequality, the edges of home ownership, and the links between housing and wellbeing. Rachel was the recipient of ‘The Berry’ award for excellence in housing research in 2019. She is currently a member of the CEDA Council on Economic Policy and National Economic Panel. She is also an Australian representative on the Steering Committee for the Asia-Pacific Network for Housing Research.

 

 


 RESPONDENT                

Emma Greenhalgh, CEO, National Shelter
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Emma_Greenhalgh

Emma Greenhalgh was appointed in March this year the CEO of National Shelter. Previously she was the Manager of Strategic Projects at Q Shelter for three years. Emma has over twenty years’ experience in social policy, planning, research and program development in the field of affordable housing and homelessness. This includes employment with research and tertiary education institutions, State and local governments, land development authorities, and the not-for-profit sector. Emma has formal qualifications in urban and regional planning, and holds a Masters of Applied Science (Research). 

 


FACILITATOR

Dr Michael Fotheringham, Executive Director, AHURI
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Michael Fotheringham

Michael is a research and policy development specialist with experience in a wide range of areas including housing and homelessness, public health, urban and community services planning. After joining the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute in 2014, he was appointed Executive Director in 2017 and is now responsible for setting the strategic direction of the Institute and leading the development of a contemporary and policy relevant evidence-base on housing, homelessness and urban issues.

View the recording

6 April 2022; 2.00pm-3.30pm AEST

Read the research

Precarious housing and wellbeing: a multi-dimensional investigation

View the presentation

Webinar presentation