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Glossary

The purpose of this glossary is to define terms commonly used in our research as well as in housing, homelessness, urban and cities policy. It is a useful reference to help you familiarise you with housing-specific terms used across our publications and on our website.

This glossary is limited to terms and acronyms most used by Australian academics and governments.

If there is a term you would like to see included in the AHURI Glossary, please contact us at information@ahuri.edu.au.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

L

Land rights

Land rights refers to legislation in Australia that enabled Indigenous people to claim land rights for country where traditional ownership can be proven. Land rights are rights created by the federal, state or territory governments. Land rights usually consist of a grant of freehold or perpetual lease title to Indigenous Australians. In December 1976 the federal parliament passed the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act. It was the first legislation in Australia that enabled Indigenous people to claim land rights for country where traditional ownership could be proven.

Land supply

Suitable land that is available for development. Typical uses for land include agricultural use, residential use, industrial use and infrastructure use. Land supply can be fixed, limited, or is sometimes uninhabitable leading to a shortage of suitable supply.

Land tax

An annual state tax levied on owners of specified land holdings such as investment properties, commercial properties, holiday homes and vacant land. In many jurisdictions land tax is not applied to a landholder’s primary place of residence.

Land-use planning

A government intervention in the urban development process, usually at state or local government level, that incorporates policies and regulations guiding urban change and determining future use of land. The purpose of land use planning includes coordinating private and public investments, informing communities about future change and mitigating potential negative impacts of developments whilst enhancing beneficial outcomes for the wider community.

Liveability

The term ‘liveability’ describes the qualities of a place that shape a community’s experience and wellbeing. Liveable communities are characterised as being ‘safe, socially cohesive and inclusive, and environmentally sustainable, with affordable housing that is linked to employment; education; shops and services; public open space; and social, cultural and recreational opportunities.

Local Government Area (LGA)

Local government areas are the legally designated parts of a State or Territory that are under the responsibility of an incorporated local governing body.

Low income housing tax credit scheme (LIHTC)

A program that is an indirect subsidy from the US federal government, jointly administered through the US Department of Treasury’s Internal Review Service (IRS) and local and state housing finance agencies, to develop affordable housing by offering developers annual taxation subsidies for a given period of time on the condition that the dwelling meets the affordability requirements of the scheme. Tax credits are awarded to developers of eligible projects and may be claimed annually over a ten-year period. These credits are usually sold to investors to raise capital (or equity) for the projects, thereby reducing the funds which need to be borrowed to complete the project. The reduced debt on the project enables the developer to offer lower, more affordable rents.

Low-income household

A household with income in the bottom 20 per cent of all household income distribution.

See income quintiles